Monday, April 27
Latest News
  1. Deutsche Bank Q1 profits fall 50% over $2.5 bn rate fixing fine
  2. Witnesses: 2 protestors shot dead in Burundi capital
  3. Small groups of protestors, police clash in Burundi capital
  4. Clashes rage in Yemen as calls for peace talks grow
  5. EU AgenPolice arrest 26 across Europe in horsemeat scandal
  6. Home ministry: At least 114 killed in Nepal quake
  7. US: Russia failing to fully implement Ukraine ceasefire
  8. Kerry urges Yemen rebels and their allies to enter talks
  9. Ex-Yemen leader urges rebel allies to heed UN, pull back
  10. Iraq lacks DNA results to test body of 'Saddam deputy'
  11. Family: Syria's sacked political spy chief dead
  12. Officials: 14 Somali, Afghan immigrants killed by train in Macedonia
  13. UNICEF: At least 115 children killed in Yemen since March 26
  14. Athens stocks jump 4.4% on hopes of EU deal
  15. EU clears 19 genetically modified products
  16. Seismologists: Strong earthquake rattles New Zealand
  17. EU says progress 'not sufficient' for Greece debt deal
  18. World leaders join silence at ceremony marking Armenian genocide
  19. Jordan's crown prince at UN takes on militant 'dark world'
  20. US officials: Iranian ships turn back from Yemen

Vatican: Lack of prospects, financial lure pushing youth to IS

Aug. 24, 2014 2:40 P.M. (Updated: Aug. 24, 2014 2:41 P.M.)
VATICAN CITY (AFP) -- Young Syrians are gravitating towards the radical Islamic State due to a lack of prospects and the lure of financial support more than "ideological conviction," the pope's Syria envoy said Saturday.

IS militants, which have been active in the Syrian conflict for several years, have made headlines in recent months after grabbing large swathes of northern Iraq and declaring a caliphate spanning the territory they hold in both countries.

They have struck fear into neighbors and countries further afield as they massacre non-Sunni Muslims and opponents, put the severed heads of their victims on display, indoctrinate young children, and implement a strict interpretation of Sharia law wherever they go.

In an interview with Radio Vatican, Mario Zenari -- who has remained in Syria throughout the bloody conflict -- said he believed that young militants rushing to join their ranks did not as a rule do so out of "ideological conviction."

"They are frustrated to see that ideals of democracy and freedom are not progressing, that the situation is deadlocked," he said.

"They go to them because they are more efficient and also sometimes because they get bigger economic support from them."

The rise of IS has also sent alarm bells in the West as nationals from many European countries have gone to join the ranks of the group.

The masked man who carried out the grisly execution of US journalist James Foley, for instance, spoke with an English accent and is believed to be British.

"In Europe too, there are so many who follow dreams of creating a utopian society ... because the attempt to reform, to create more democratic states, with bigger freedom, has failed," Zenari said.

He also bemoaned the fact that the current crisis in Iraq has overshadowed the tragedy in Syria, where more than 191,000 people have died since the conflict broke out in 2011.

"Syria has disappeared from the radars of the international community, it has been forgotten," he said, pointing out that there was still an average of 180 deaths a day in the country.

The group's fighters are still hugely active in Syria, and are currently pressing onto Aleppo, the big northern city, he added.

Ma'an staff contributed to this report.
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015