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Haaretz: Kerry ceasefire proposal called for open Israel-Gaza borders

July 27, 2014 1:42 P.M. (Updated: July 29, 2014 3:01 P.M.)
BETHLEHEM (Ma'an) -- A draft of US Secretary of State John Kerry's ceasefire proposal that was shown to Israeli officials on Friday called for the opening of Gaza-Israel border crossings and ensuring "the economic livelihood" of Palestinians in the Strip, an Israeli newspaper reported Sunday.

The document, titled "Framework for Humanitarian Ceasefire in Gaza," also said a lasting truce would make possible the "transfer of funds to Gaza for the payment of salaries for public employees," Haaretz reported.

According to the report, the proposed ceasefire would also "address all security concerns."

Israel would not be allowed to continue its operation to destroy tunnels during the initial ceasefire, the draft reportedly stipulated.

It made no explicit mention of the demilitarization of Palestinian factions in Gaza.

Israeli officials were "in shock" upon reading the draft, saying it ignored Israel's security concerns.

"We succeeded in foiling that document and now we are discussing other options," Haaretz quoted officials as saying.

An associate of Kerry reportedly responded: "There is no paper and no proposal. The draft was based on the Egyptian proposal that Israel wholeheartedly supported. So if they are opposed, they are opposed their own plan."

Israel voted down a ceasefire proposal Friday, instead agreeing to a 12-hour humanitarian truce starting Saturday at 8 a.m.

On July 15, Israel imposed a ceasefire agreed upon by Egypt and the US. Hamas and other Palestinian factions continued firing rockets, saying they had not been involved in negotiating the ceasefire and heard about it "through the media."

Israel began its ground operation operation in Gaza two days later, and the death toll among Palestinians, mostly civilians, soared.

Palestinian groups in Gaza say they will not accept any ceasefire that does not involve the lifting of the eight-year blockade on the Strip, which has severely limited imports and exports and has led to frequent humanitarian crises.
Ma'an News Agency
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