Sunday, May 03
Latest News
  1. UN warns on Yemen aid as Saudi reports first border attack
  2. Rescue worker: Mass grave of 'boat people' found in south Thailand
  3. USGS: 7.1 magnitude earthquake hits Papua New Guinea
  4. WFP halts food distribution in Yemen due to fuel shortage
  5. Britain tells UN Iran trying to buy nuclear technology
  6. Austria rejects US extradition of Ukrainian oligarch
  7. Govt: Japan consumer inflation up for first time in 10 months
  8. Official: Nepal quake toll climbs to 6,204
  9. Iraqi Kurd leader to visit US for talks next week
  10. Iran to release seized Maersk vessel after 'debt settled'
  11. US warships to 'accompany' US-flagged ships into Gulf
  12. Yemen rebels attack Saudi border, dozens dead
  13. Airbus says will file criminal complaint over US spy claims
  14. Defense Ministry: Clashes between Mali army, rebels leave 19 dead
  15. Mexican oil giant Pemex reports $6.5-bn loss for Q1
  16. France, German, Ukraine, Russian leaders urge end to Ukraine fighting
  17. Chile's Calbuco volcano erupts again
  18. About 160 more hostages rescued from Boko Haram stronghold
  19. Kremlin: North Korea's Kim cancels planned visit to Russia
  20. Maersk says crew safe on cargo ship seized by Iran

Radical Jews protest at holy Jerusalem site

June 10, 2014 9:49 P.M. (Updated: June 11, 2014 12:55 P.M.)
JERUSALEM (AFP) -- Several dozen radical Jews gathered Monday at the Jerusalem site known as the Cenacle to protest against Christian pilgrims praying there for Pentecost, a police spokeswoman said.

"Around 30 Jewish faithful gathered to pray in the presence of (rightwing Likud) MP Moshe Feiglin," Luba Samri told AFP.

The Cenacle, or Upper Room, on Mount Zion is in a two-story building considered holy to both Christians and Jews, who regard it as the place where the biblical figure David was buried.

An AFP photographer said Christian pilgrims and tourists were kept by police in one part of the church as Jews protested, danced, and prayed.

Pope Francis ended his recent Middle East trip by celebrating mass at the Cenacle, amid a decades-long debate over prayer rites at the site where Christians believe Jesus had his Last Supper.

For Jews, it is the ground floor which is sacred, revered since the 12th century as the burial place of David, who ruled from Jerusalem, although the site has never been excavated and the contents of its sarcophagus are unknown.

The Cenacle is also where Christians believe that the Holy Spirit descended at Pentecost, 50 days after Easter.

"The Christians prayed at the tomb of king David, and for us this is blasphemy," one of the Jewish protesters, Shaga Brand, told AFP about Christian prayers there on Sunday, calling it a "provocation".

The protesters also hung placards in the nave accusing the government of lying by saying the Cenacle's status quo would remain unchanged and under Israeli authority.

Under Israeli law, Christians are only allowed to pray there twice a year, prompting efforts by the Vatican to negotiate greater access rights to what is one of the most sacred sites in Christendom.

Those attempts have sparked a major backlash by nationalist Jewish groups, many of whom wrongly believe Israel is poised to sign over sovereign rights to the site.
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015