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Qalandia checkpoint a bottleneck for West Bank traffic

Feb. 28, 2013 6:08 P.M. (Updated: March 2, 2013 11:05 A.M.)
RAMALLAH (Ma’an) – Thousands of Palestinians who travel back and forth from the southern West Bank to the central city of Ramallah spend hours every day in traffic in a space only two kilometers wide - the Qalandiya checkpoint.

The Israeli terminal, to the south of Ramallah, stands between Ramallah and Jerusalem.

It happens to be on the main road linking Ramallah with the southern West Bank districts of Bethlehem and Hebron. As a result, employees who work in Ramallah, students at Birzeit University, and others who need to visit family members and friends have to go through a very heavy traffic jam as they arrive at the Qalandiya checkpoint area.

Ma’an TV documented a typical scene at the West Bank bottleneck.

“The main reason of the traffic jam is the lack of road traffic control,” says one resident.

“Secondly, the road is too narrow to take all this traffic, and so the Palestinian Authority should find an alternative. However, the PA doesn’t care at all, simply because ministers do not use this route as they use the DCO (District Coordination Office) route.

“If a minister travels on this route and gets stranded for two or three hours, he will eventually consider looking for an alternative. But, since they don’t use this route, the don’t worry about the people.”
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