Thursday, July 02
Latest News
  1. Saudi Prince Alwaleed pledges $32 bn fortune to charity
  2. Police: 6 killed in Burundi gun battle
  3. 36 soldiers and civilians, 38 militants killed in Egypt's Sinai
  4. Liberia announces two more confirmed Ebola cases
  5. Tunisia identifies all 38 victims of beach massacre, 30 British
  6. Iran nuclear talks deadline extended to July 7
  7. HRW urges Gulf states to follow Kuwait on maid rights
  8. Medics: rebel fire kills 20 civilians in Yemen's Aden
  9. Monitor: Syria Kurds regain control of Tal Abyad after IS attack
  10. NGO: in first, IS beheads two Syria women for 'sorcery'
  11. UN envoy to brief council on war in Syria
  12. Family: Australian killed fighting for Kurds against IS in Syria
  13. Monitor: IS re-enters Syria's Tal Abyad, takes district
  14. Egypt's Sisi pledges tougher laws after prosecutor killing
  15. Tunisia admits was not prepared for beach attack
  16. Orange reaches a deal for split with Israel's Partner after spat
  17. IS car bomb kills 28 in Yemen capital Sanaa
  18. IS beheads two Syrian women 'for the first time'
  19. Kerry says 'too soon' to tell if Iran deal sealed
  20. Bomb targets Egypt state prosecutor convoy in Cairo

Israel says it successfully tests new missile defense

Feb. 25, 2013 9:18 A.M. (Updated: Feb. 25, 2013 2:20 P.M.)
JERUSALEM (Reuters) -- Israel carried out a successful test of its upgraded Arrow interceptor system on Monday, which is designed to destroy in space the kind of missiles held by Syria and Iran, the Israeli Defense Ministry said.

The US-backed Arrow III system deploys "kamikaze" satellites that target ballistic missiles above the earth's atmosphere, hitting them high enough to allow for any non-conventional warheads to disintegrate safely.

Monday's test was the first live flight for the Arrow III, but did not involve the interception of any target.

"The test examined for the first time the capabilities and the performance of the new Arrow III, considered to be the most innovative and revolutionary interceptor in the world," the Defense Ministry said.

A ministry official said the test, which was conducted from a site along Israel's Mediterranean coast and lasted six and a half minutes, was "100 percent successful".

In a statement, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said: "Israel's hand is always outstretched in peace but we are also prepared for other eventualities. In this vein, I praise the successful test of the Arrow III."

Designers say the system has proved a success in up to 90 percent of previous tests.

"The success of the test is an important milestone in the operational capabilities of the state of Israel to be able to defend itself against threats in the region," the ministry statement added.

But the ministry official said the timing of the test, which took months to prepare, was not related to current tensions with Iran or Syria. He said Israel plans another flight test followed by a simulated interception in space over the Mediterranean.

US backing

Arrow is the long-range segment in Israel's three-tier missile shield. This also includes the successfully deployed "Iron Dome", which targets short-range rockets and projectiles, and the mid-range "David's Sling", still under development. They can be deployed alongside other US systems.

Officials say that if Arrow failed to hit an incoming missile at high altitude, there would still be time to destroy it with other systems before it hit its intended target.

The Pentagon and the US firm Boeing are partners in Arrow.

Israel has accused Iran of seeking to build nuclear weapons and has hinted it might strike the Islamic Republic in an effort to halt its atomic program.

Boeing thinks that potential clients for the system may include India, Singapore and South Korea.

"As we prove out that technology, and show that it's not only affordable but effective, we think there will be additional global market opportunities for that capability," Dennis Muilenburg, chief executive of Boeing's defense, space and security arm, told Reuters last year.

The United States and Israel have been developing Arrow jointly since 1988. Boeing's counterpart on the project is state-owned Israel Aerospace Industries.

The US financial contribution to progressively improved versions of the Arrow system tops $1 billion, the Congressional Research Service said in a March 2012 report to lawmakers.
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015