Sunday, July 05
Latest News
  1. Lawyer: 2 London teens have married IS group fighters
  2. Saudi-led air strike on Yemen rebel bastion 'kills 23'
  3. IAEA: Iran atomic bomb probe may be completed in 2015
  4. FM: Iran will help meet 'common challenges' like extremism
  5. Greece PM urges 'No' vote to 'live with dignity in Europe'
  6. Ministry: Saudi policeman killed in raid, IS flags found
  7. UNESCO condemns IS destruction of Syria's Palmyra antiquities
  8. Tunisian Abu Iyadh, reported dead in Libya, is Qaeda veteran
  9. Nigerian troops battling Boko Haram gunmen outside Maiduguri
  10. Kuwait tightens security as emir attends joint prayers
  11. Mourners hold minute's silence at Tunisia beach attack resort
  12. Nigerian leader condemns 'inhuman, barbaric' Boko Haram attacks
  13. Greek banks say have sufficient liquidity until Tuesday
  14. UN watchdog chief says 'more work needed' with Iran after visit
  15. Yemen clashes, strikes kill 21 in Aden
  16. Tunisia arrests 8 with 'direct links' to beach massacre
  17. Israel says Hamas linked to IS assault on Egyptians
  18. Iraq Christians train to recapture homes from IS
  19. IS destroys statue outside Syria's Palmyra museum
  20. UN watchdog chief says 'more work needed' with Iran after visit

Tunisia's outgoing PM apologizes to Tunisian people

Feb. 21, 2013 10:04 P.M. (Updated: Feb. 21, 2013 10:04 P.M.)
TUNIS (Reuters) -- Tunisia's outgoing prime minister Hamadi Jebali apologized on Thursday to the Tunisian people and urged them to unite to pull the country out of its political crisis.

Jebali, head of government for 14 months, has refused to lead the next administration and his Islamist Ennahda party says it will soon name a replacement.

Jebali, secretary-general of Ennahda, resigned on Tuesday after his plan for an apolitical technocrat cabinet to prepare for elections collapsed, largely because of opposition from within his party and its leader Rached Ghannouchi.

"I apologize to the people of Tunisia because I failed and disappointed them," Jabali said in a televised speech to the nation.

But he said he was "optimistic that consensus will win and the revolution will win".

The assassination of secular opposition leader Chokri Belaid on Feb. 6 plunged Tunisia into its worst political crisis since the uprising that inspired a wave of Arab revolts two years ago.

The killing sent protesters flooding into the streets, exposing the deep rifts between the Islamists in power and their liberal and secular-minded opponents.

Jebali called on politicians, trade unionists and journalists to rally around the interests of the country.

"Tunisians must be patient during the coming months," he said. "Demands and sit-ins must stop until the revolution wins."
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015