Wednesday, July 29
Latest News
  1. Turkey pounds PKK as parliament meets in emergency session
  2. Yemen to merge 'resistance' fighters with army
  3. Study finds promising experimental MERS vaccine
  4. France seeks to warm up Iran ties with Rouhani invite
  5. Iran's Zarif has 'no concern' about nuclear deal
  6. NATO vows solidarity with Turkey over Islamic State
  7. Afghanistan investigating reports of Taliban leader's death
  8. Israel PM approves 300 settler homes in occupied West Bank
  9. Israeli strike on Syrian town kills 5 pro-regime forces
  10. Nuclear deal done, Iran urged to free Washington Post man
  11. Ministry: Bomb blast kills 2 Bahrain police
  12. Army: Turkish warplanes pound Kurdish militants in southeast
  13. Eurotunnel says 2,000 migrants tried to enter premises overnight
  14. Saudi-led air raids, clashes shatter Yemen truce
  15. Ministry: Cairo furniture factory fire kills 19 people
  16. Obama flies out from Addis Ababa, ending regional visit
  17. Kerry gears up to defend Iran deal for Mideast, Asia swing
  18. HRW says Saudi-led Yemen raid 'apparent war crime'
  19. Saudi king backs Turkish military action
  20. Top EU diplomat due in Iran for nuclear deal talks

Tunisia's outgoing PM apologizes to Tunisian people

Feb. 21, 2013 10:04 P.M. (Updated: Feb. 21, 2013 10:04 P.M.)
TUNIS (Reuters) -- Tunisia's outgoing prime minister Hamadi Jebali apologized on Thursday to the Tunisian people and urged them to unite to pull the country out of its political crisis.

Jebali, head of government for 14 months, has refused to lead the next administration and his Islamist Ennahda party says it will soon name a replacement.

Jebali, secretary-general of Ennahda, resigned on Tuesday after his plan for an apolitical technocrat cabinet to prepare for elections collapsed, largely because of opposition from within his party and its leader Rached Ghannouchi.

"I apologize to the people of Tunisia because I failed and disappointed them," Jabali said in a televised speech to the nation.

But he said he was "optimistic that consensus will win and the revolution will win".

The assassination of secular opposition leader Chokri Belaid on Feb. 6 plunged Tunisia into its worst political crisis since the uprising that inspired a wave of Arab revolts two years ago.

The killing sent protesters flooding into the streets, exposing the deep rifts between the Islamists in power and their liberal and secular-minded opponents.

Jebali called on politicians, trade unionists and journalists to rally around the interests of the country.

"Tunisians must be patient during the coming months," he said. "Demands and sit-ins must stop until the revolution wins."
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015