Tuesday, July 07
Latest News
  1. EU: Eurozone stability 'not in question' after Greek vote
  2. Turkey summons commanders to discuss Syria intervention
  3. World powers begin talks to seal Iran nuclear deal
  4. Syria army enters last rebel bastion by Lebanon border
  5. Egypt looks set to approve disputed anti-terror law
  6. Fighting grips Yemen's Aden as UN envoy presses truce bid
  7. Kuwait mulls charging more than 40 over mosque bomb
  8. Sousse governor among officials fired over Tunisia attack
  9. Polling opens in crucial Greece bailout referendum
  10. Greece will decide its own 'destiny' says PM Tsipras
  11. Police, witness: Suicide bomber kills five in NE Nigeria church
  12. Clinton: China 'trying to hack into everything'
  13. Airstrikes hit multiple IS targets in Syria stronghold
  14. Tunisia declares state of emergency after beach attack
  15. Ministers back to Vienna for final Iran nuclear deal push
  16. Lawyer: 2 London teens have married IS group fighters
  17. Saudi-led air strike on Yemen rebel bastion 'kills 23'
  18. IAEA: Iran atomic bomb probe may be completed in 2015
  19. FM: Iran will help meet 'common challenges' like extremism
  20. Greece PM urges 'No' vote to 'live with dignity in Europe'

Adviser: EU could deploy peace force in post-conflict Syria

Jan. 29, 2013 10:41 P.M. (Updated: Jan. 29, 2013 10:41 P.M.)
By: Adrian Croft
BRUSSELS (Reuters) -- European Union planners are looking at ways to help stabilize Syria when the civil war is over, and sending an EU military force to keep the peace could be an option, the bloc's top military officer said on Tuesday.

The EU has a 2,000-strong rapid reaction force, known as a battle group, on standby at all times, ready for peace keeping or humanitarian action in an emergency, but it has never yet been deployed.

Western nations are reluctant to get involved in the conflict in Syria, where more than 60,000 people have been killed in a 22-month uprising against President Bashar Assad.

French General Patrick de Rousiers, head of the EU Military Committee, said nobody believed an outside military intervention in Syria at present would improve the situation.

"It would worsen it at this stage. But this can change and depending on the way that it changes, then the EU can play a profound role because there will be the need to stabilize (the country)," de Rousiers told reporters.

Once the conflict eases, there will be a need for development projects and measures to prevent renewed fighting, he said. "So in this case, yes, a battle group could be useful, could be an option, but it is not the only one."

There were other ways the EU could respond, he said, without elaborating.

"It will really depend on the situation. What is needed now is that we think ahead and this is what is being done here - internal discussions in order to see a whole range of options of what could be put forward," he said.

De Rousiers, who acts as military adviser to EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton, said the ideas were being discussed within the EU's foreign service and had not yet been proposed to the EU's 27 states, some of which would probably object to putting EU peacekeepers into a hostile situation.
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015