Tuesday, Sept. 01
Latest News
  1. Libya car bomb wounds one, damages office of Eni firm
  2. UN envoy to meet with Libya's Tripoli parliament ahead of talks
  3. Border agency: Migrants using fake Syrian passports to enter EU
  4. Migrant trains arrive in Austria as crisis deepens
  5. Turkish court arrests British journalists on terror charges
  6. Locals: Boko Haram kills nearly 80 in NE Nigeria villages
  7. Austria smuggler crackdown as Europe divided over migrant crisis
  8. 'Largest ever' Med gas field found off Egypt
  9. Egypt muezzin suspended over 'Facebook prayer call'
  10. 3 Canadians, Pakistani, Nigerian among dead in Saudi fire
  11. 'A Sinner in Mecca' documents gay Muslim pilgrimage
  12. A year on, Yazidis so close yet so far from Iraq hub
  13. Delayed Egypt elections to start on October 17
  14. Blast at Syria's Palmyra prompts fears for famed temple
  15. 11 dead, dozens hurt in fire at Saudi oil giant housing complex
  16. Red Crescent: 7 bodies wash up on Libya beach
  17. Egypt elections to start on October 17
  18. Kuwaiti MP: Iran is 'true enemy' of Gulf Arabs
  19. Iran bars Barenboim, thwarting Tehran concert plan
  20. Qatar exports plunge over 40 pct in year

Tribal lawmakers to dominate Jordan's parliament

Jan. 24, 2013 12:09 P.M. (Updated: Jan. 26, 2013 6:10 P.M.)
By: Suleiman Al-Khalidi
AMMAN (Reuters) -- Pro-government tribal candidates strengthened their grip on Jordan's parliament after Wednesday's general election, boycotted as rigged by the Muslim Brotherhood-led opposition, according to preliminary results.

State television on Thursday listed most of the 150 seats contested, saying they were won by independents, candidates with limited political agendas who rely on family and tribal allegiances rather than party backing.

The Islamic Action Front, the Muslim Brotherhood's political wing in Jordan and the country's largest opposition party, shunned the election because it said the electoral law was designed to curb its influence.

The front said last year it would boycott the polls after the tribal-dominated parliament passed a electoral law that magnified the clout of native Jordanian constituencies at the expense of cities, which are home to many citizens of Palestinian origin and which tend to be Islamist strongholds.

Turnout for Wednesday's vote was 56 percent of the country's 2.3 million registered voters.

The Islamists say only a fraction of Jordan's eligible voters cast their ballots and that another 2.4 million eligible voters did not register to vote on Wednesday, Jordan's first parliamentary election since the Arab uprisings.

Islamists draw more support in the densely populated cities, where most of the country's 7 million population live, and voting is more along political and ideological lines.

In the major cities, including the capital, all strongholds of the country's most organized political grouping, turnout figures averaged around 40 percent. In sparsely populated rural and Bedouin areas it was more than 70 percent.

Officials say the elections were a milestone in democratic reforms espoused by King Abdullah and that the opposition had misjudged the popular mood, saying many voters had shunned the opposition's boycott call.

Tribalism has been on the rise as a political element in Jordan, blunting the emergence of national parties and curbing the influence of Islamists.
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015