Monday, July 06
Latest News
  1. Fighting grips Yemen's Aden as UN envoy presses truce bid
  2. Kuwait mulls charging more than 40 over mosque bomb
  3. Sousse governor among officials fired over Tunisia attack
  4. Polling opens in crucial Greece bailout referendum
  5. Greece will decide its own 'destiny' says PM Tsipras
  6. Police, witness: Suicide bomber kills five in NE Nigeria church
  7. Clinton: China 'trying to hack into everything'
  8. Airstrikes hit multiple IS targets in Syria stronghold
  9. Tunisia declares state of emergency after beach attack
  10. Ministers back to Vienna for final Iran nuclear deal push
  11. Lawyer: 2 London teens have married IS group fighters
  12. Saudi-led air strike on Yemen rebel bastion 'kills 23'
  13. IAEA: Iran atomic bomb probe may be completed in 2015
  14. FM: Iran will help meet 'common challenges' like extremism
  15. Greece PM urges 'No' vote to 'live with dignity in Europe'
  16. Ministry: Saudi policeman killed in raid, IS flags found
  17. UNESCO condemns IS destruction of Syria's Palmyra antiquities
  18. Tunisian Abu Iyadh, reported dead in Libya, is Qaeda veteran
  19. Nigerian troops battling Boko Haram gunmen outside Maiduguri
  20. Kuwait tightens security as emir attends joint prayers

Activists: Syrian rebels clash with Kurds in northeast

Jan. 22, 2013 1:43 P.M. (Updated: Jan. 22, 2013 8:26 P.M.)
BEIRUT (Reuters) -- At least 56 people have been killed in a week of fighting in northeast Syria between anti-government rebels and members of the long-oppressed Kurdish minority who have seized on the civil war to try to secure self-rule, activists said on Tuesday.

The British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, which collates reports on Syria's violence from local activists, said on Tuesday that the anti-Damascus rebels were using tanks and mortars on Tuesday against Kurdish forces.

With Arab rebels entangling government forces to the west and south, the Kurds, who make up around 10 percent of the population, have exploited the vacuum to set up the Kurdish schools and cultural centers long denied them under Baath party rule, as well as police and armed militias.

But they have remained at arm's length from the increasingly Islamist-dominated mostly Sunni Arab rebels, fearing that these would not honor the autonomy aspirations of a region that holds a significant part of Syria's estimated 2.5 billion barrels of crude oil reserves.

On Tuesday, fighters of the Kurdish People's Defense Units clashed with several rebel groups in the city of Ras al-Ain in Syria's northern Hasaka province, the Observatory said.

"The clashes erupted (last) Wednesday ... and (have) resulted in the deaths of at least 56 fighters," the group said.

The fighting is one of many sectarian or ethnic fault lines that have prevented the emergence of a single coherent movement to try to oust President Bashar Assad since insurgents took up arms after the government cracked down on peaceful protests in March 2011.

Since then, the conflict has become a full-scale civil war in which more than 60,000 people have been killed, 650,000 pushed to flee the country and well over a million made homeless within Syria.

Late on Monday, the Observatory said at least 30 people were killed when a car bomb went off at the local headquarters of a pro-government militia on the eastern outskirts of Hama, a city in central Syria along the main north-south highway.

The death toll from that attack could rise as high as 50 and include civilians, the group said. The state news agency SANA said the blast had been caused by a suicide bomber and that 25 citizens had been killed.
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015