Saturday, Aug. 29
Latest News
  1. US to Iran: Release Hekmati from 'unjust detention'
  2. Pentagon: Militant hacker killed in US air strike was recruite
  3. UN: Satellite images confirm Palmyra temple destruction
  4. UN envoy urges speedy Libya talks to curb migrant crisis
  5. Four arrested over Austria truck tragedy
  6. Turkey PM forms interim government including pro-Kurdish party
  7. Amnesty accuses UAE of torturing Libyan-Canadian
  8. Qatar Airways 'shamed' into action over pregnancy, marriage
  9. Iran premieres big-budget epic film 'Muhammad'
  10. Tel Aviv's 'Iranian embassy' turns out to be atomic hoax
  11. Iraq PM orders forces to prepare to open Green Zone
  12. Officer: Yemen army recruits 4,800 southern fighters
  13. Monitor: Qaeda-led forces advance on Syria airbase
  14. 71 migrants perish in Austria truck tragedy
  15. German court says ban on rallies in Heidenau 'illegal'
  16. Brazil enters recession in second quarter
  17. State news: Greek snap election set for September 20
  18. Aid workers: Toll in Libya migrant shipwreck rises to 76
  19. IS kills two generals in Iraq, advances in Syria
  20. Qatar Airways 'shamed' into action over pregnancy, marriage

Tunisia arrests 'terrorist' group and seizes weapons

Jan. 17, 2013 7:38 P.M. (Updated: Jan. 18, 2013 12:50 P.M.)
TUNIS (Reuters) -- Tunisian authorities said on Thursday they had arrested a "terrorist" group and seized a big arms cache, as security forces went on alert after a mass hostage-taking by Islamist militants in neighboring Algeria.

The arms included Kalashnikov rifles and rocket-propelled grenades, a security source said. A statement by the Ministry of Interior said they were discovered in the southern town of Medenin, without giving further details.

Al-Qaida-linked Islamists seized dozens of hostages in a raid on a gas field plant in southeast Algeria this week, to the south of Tunisia.

Twenty-five hostages escaped and six were killed on Thursday when Algerian forces launched an operation to free them, Algerian sources said.

The Islamists said that the attacks were in retaliation for Algeria allowing France to use its air space to carry out bombing raids in Mali.

Since the overthrow of former President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali two years ago, the influence of radical Islamists in Tunisia has increased. Secularist groups have accused the ruling moderate Islamist Ennahda party of being too soft on extremists.

Last month, Interior Minister Ali Laryed said Tunisian police had arrested 16 Islamist militants who had been accumulating arms with the aim of creating an Islamic state.

They were linked to Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb and had been planning to attack security headquarters, he said.
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015