Monday, April 27
Latest News
  1. Deutsche Bank Q1 profits fall 50% over $2.5 bn rate fixing fine
  2. Witnesses: 2 protestors shot dead in Burundi capital
  3. Small groups of protestors, police clash in Burundi capital
  4. Clashes rage in Yemen as calls for peace talks grow
  5. EU AgenPolice arrest 26 across Europe in horsemeat scandal
  6. Home ministry: At least 114 killed in Nepal quake
  7. US: Russia failing to fully implement Ukraine ceasefire
  8. Kerry urges Yemen rebels and their allies to enter talks
  9. Ex-Yemen leader urges rebel allies to heed UN, pull back
  10. Iraq lacks DNA results to test body of 'Saddam deputy'
  11. Family: Syria's sacked political spy chief dead
  12. Officials: 14 Somali, Afghan immigrants killed by train in Macedonia
  13. UNICEF: At least 115 children killed in Yemen since March 26
  14. Athens stocks jump 4.4% on hopes of EU deal
  15. EU clears 19 genetically modified products
  16. Seismologists: Strong earthquake rattles New Zealand
  17. EU says progress 'not sufficient' for Greece debt deal
  18. World leaders join silence at ceremony marking Armenian genocide
  19. Jordan's crown prince at UN takes on militant 'dark world'
  20. US officials: Iranian ships turn back from Yemen

Tunisia frees man held over attack on US consulate in Libya

Jan. 8, 2013 5:53 A.M. (Updated: Jan. 9, 2013 3:29 A.M.)
TUNIS (Reuters) -- Tunisia has freed, for lack of evidence, a Tunisian man who had been suspected of involvement in an Islamist militant attack in Libya last year in which the US ambassador was killed, his lawyer said on Tuesday.

Ali Harzi was one of two Tunisians named in October by the Daily Beast website as having been detained in Turkey over the violence in which Christopher Stevens, the US ambassador to Libya, and three other American officials were killed.

"The judge decided to free Harzi and he is free now," lawyer Anouar Awled Ali told Reuters. "The release came in response to our request to free him for lack of evidence and after he underwent the hearing with American investigators as a witness in the case."

A Tunisian justice ministry spokesman confirmed the release of Harzi but declined to elaborate.

A month ago, Harzi refused to be interviewed by visiting US FBI investigators over the Sept. 11 assault on the US consulate in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi.

The Daily Beast reported that shortly after the attacks began, Harzi posted an update on an unspecified social media site about the fighting.

It said Harzi was on his way to Syria when he was detained in Turkey at the behest of US authorities, and that he was affiliated with a militant group in North Africa.
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015