Friday, Sept. 04
Latest News
  1. Israeli army: 5 tourists attacked by local residents in Hebron
  2. Death toll in IS Yemen mosque attack rises to 32
  3. Netanyahu defends Iran deal fight after Obama secures support
  4. Security sources: 4 Turkish police killed in PKK bombing
  5. Hungary's Orban: Migrant crisis is German, not European problem
  6. WHO: Liberia declared free of Ebola - again
  7. Official: over 230,000 refugees arrive in Greece this year
  8. Guatemalan president resigns over corruption firestorm
  9. Double suicide attack kills 30 in North Cameroon
  10. Italy PM says Europe 'cannot just get emotional' about migrants
  11. Court: Two British reporters held in Turkey to be released
  12. Chung claims 'fraud' in FIFA presidential poll
  13. Obama expected to press Saudi King on conflicts in Syria, Yemen
  14. UN: 13 million children denied education by Mideast wars
  15. Drowned toddler sparks fresh horror over Europe migrant crisis
  16. IS claims Yemen Shiite mosque attack that killed 28
  17. US calls for release of Chinese rights activists
  18. Trial of Congolese rebel opens with gruesome images
  19. Gunmen kills 2 Yemeni staff of Red Cross
  20. Iran to confiscate cars of 'poorly veiled' women

Pope tells Abbas of hope for Mideast solution after UN vote

Dec. 17, 2012 4:03 P.M. (Updated: Dec. 18, 2012 6:43 P.M.)
VATICAN CITY (Reuters) -- Pope Benedict told President Mahmoud Abbas on Monday the Vatican hoped the recent de facto recognition of Palestinian statehood at the United Nations would spur the international community to find a solution to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

Abbas, who is on a tour of Europe to thank countries that supported the Nov. 29 resolution by the UN General Assembly recognizing Palestine, held private talks with the pope for about 25 minutes in the Vatican's Apostolic Palace.

"It is hoped that (the resolution) will encourage the commitment of the international community to finding a fair and lasting solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, which may be reached only by resuming negotiations between the parties, in good faith and according due respect to the rights of both," a Vatican statement said.

The 193-nation General Assembly overwhelmingly approved a resolution to upgrade the Palestinian Authority's observer status at the United Nations from "entity" to "non-member state," the same status as the Vatican..

The Vatican welcomed the resolution, which amounted to an implicit recognition of a Palestinian state.

But at the time the Holy See also renewed its call for an internationally guaranteed special status for Jerusalem, something which Israel rejects.

Israel captured East Jerusalem - along with the West Bank and Gaza Strip - in the 1967 Middle East war and later annexed it in a move not recognized internationally. Israel now regards Jerusalem as its "united and eternal" capital.

Palestinians want East Jerusalem to be the capital of a state they seek in the West Bank and Gaza and agree with the Vatican that the city needs international guarantees.

Israel has always maintained that it already guarantees Jerusalem's special nature as sacred to the three great monotheistic religions - Christianity, Judaism and Islam.

The Vatican said the pope and Abbas also discussed the "situation in the region, troubled by numerous conflicts," which was seen as a clear reference to the civil war in Syria.

Abbas was also meeting Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti and Pier Luigi Bersani, the head of the Democratic Party, which is widely expected to win national elections early next year.

Italy's center-left has traditionally supported Palestinians while the center-right has been closer to Israel.
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015