Wednesday, May 27
Latest News
  1. EU asks member states to admit 40,000 asylum seekers
  2. Official: Bangladesh plans to move thousands of Rohingya to island
  3. Iraq forces in Anbar push, stir over operation codename
  4. Brother urges Iran to free reporter held on 'laughable' charges
  5. Yemeni pleads guilty in New York to Al-Qaeda conspiracy
  6. UN seeks new date for Yemen talks
  7. Draft bill on transsexuals sent to Iran parliament
  8. EU to unveil latest plan to absorb migrants fairly
  9. Spokesman: Libya PM escapes assassination attempt
  10. AFP: Multiple explosions, gunfire in Kabul diplomatic area
  11. Govt: Kabul gunbattle ends with four attackers killed
  12. Turkey says training of moderate Syrian rebels begins with US
  13. Pro-government fighters push rebels out of Yemen city
  14. Police: suspected Fulani herdsmen kill at least 23 in central Nigeria
  15. Obama: Russia adopting 'increasingly aggressive posture' in Ukraine
  16. Washington Post reporter stands trial in Iran for spying
  17. Austrian 14-year-old jailed on 'terrorism' charges
  18. Saudi beheads 88th person, exceeding last year's total
  19. Charter buys US giant Time Warner Cable in $78.7 billion deal
  20. Diplomat: France suspends security cooperation with Burundi

Israeli court urges reroute of wall around Battir

Dec. 13, 2012 8:10 P.M. (Updated: Dec. 15, 2012 8:19 P.M.)
JERUSALEM (Reuters) -- Israel's highest court has urged defense officials to reroute a wall planned for construction on ancient farmland at a West Bank Palestinian village.

Israeli judges have ordered changes in Israel's wall through occupied land before, but the latest decision followed a rare appeal involving support from an Israeli government environmental agency for a Palestinian challenge.

In their ruling on Thursday, judges wrote that only a 500-meter long section of the wall was under dispute at the village of Battir, known for its terraced agricultural fields, some of which are believed go back to biblical times.

"In light of the unique character of the region in question, it would be worthy for security officials to do some more thinking especially about what type of divider and security arrangements to employ in the problematic section," the justices wrote.

The court gave the Defense Ministry a 90-day deadline to respond. Appellants in the case will have 15 days after that to react.

Battir is inside territory Israel captured in a 1967 war that Palestinians seek for a state. Villagers say the wall would irreversibly disrupt agriculture in their community.

Shaul Goldstein, director of the Israeli Nature and Parks Authority that backed the petition, said on Wednesday his group did "not object to putting up obstacles to stop terrorists, it's just that we believe here that other methods can be used".

The International Court of Justice ruled in 2004 that the Israeli wall, made of razor-wire fencing and huge cement blocks, was illegal.

Israeli army colonel Ofer Hindi, representing the state in the Battir case, argued for the security benefits of the planned section by saying that two villagers were jailed in 2008 for planning to bomb a railway that runs by Battir.
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015