Friday, Aug. 28
Latest News
  1. Amnesty accuses UAE of torturing Libyan-Canadian
  2. Qatar Airways 'shamed' into action over pregnancy, marriage
  3. Iran premieres big-budget epic film 'Muhammad'
  4. Tel Aviv's 'Iranian embassy' turns out to be atomic hoax
  5. Iraq PM orders forces to prepare to open Green Zone
  6. Officer: Yemen army recruits 4,800 southern fighters
  7. Monitor: Qaeda-led forces advance on Syria airbase
  8. 71 migrants perish in Austria truck tragedy
  9. German court says ban on rallies in Heidenau 'illegal'
  10. Brazil enters recession in second quarter
  11. State news: Greek snap election set for September 20
  12. Aid workers: Toll in Libya migrant shipwreck rises to 76
  13. IS kills two generals in Iraq, advances in Syria
  14. Qatar Airways 'shamed' into action over pregnancy, marriage
  15. Egypt court sentences 12 IS supporters to death
  16. UN moves forward with plans for Syria chemical weapons probe
  17. Iran premieres big-budget epic film 'Muhammad'
  18. Israel to use crop, water technology to win friends in Africa
  19. Merkel says Austrian tragedy a 'warning' in migrant crisis
  20. US economy grew 3.7% in second quarter

NATO: Deploying missiles in Turkey could take several weeks

Nov. 30, 2012 7:42 P.M. (Updated: Nov. 30, 2012 7:42 P.M.)
BRUSSELS (Reuters) -- NATO allies are expected to take several weeks to deploy Patriot surface-to-air missiles to Turkey once the alliance approves Ankara's request, a NATO spokeswoman said Friday.

NATO experts are in Turkey assessing the best sites to place the missiles that Ankara has requested from NATO to defend it against any spillover from civil war in neighboring Syria.

Once the team has reported back to NATO, military commanders will draw up a recommendation to alliance ambassadors who are expected to give the go-ahead to sending the missiles early next week, according to NATO diplomats.

"I would expect that if the decision is taken it could take several weeks to deploy, rather than months," NATO spokeswoman Oana Lungescu said.

Germany, the Netherlands and the United States have Patriots available.

Some of those countries may need parliamentary approval to send Patriots and Lungescu said she did not want to judge how long those national processes would take.

Turkey formally asked NATO for the Patriot missiles earlier this month after weeks of talks with NATO allies about how to shore up security on its 560-mile border.

It has repeatedly scrambled fighter jets along the frontier and responded in kind to stray Syrian shells flying into its territory.

Syria, Iran and Russia have all criticized Turkey's request for Patriots, saying the move would deepen instability in the region.
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015