Friday, May 22
Latest News
  1. Huge blasts outside Sanaa after coalition air raids
  2. Monitor: Rebels seize hospital holding 150 Syrian soldiers
  3. Blast hits Shiite mosque in eastern Saudi
  4. US envoy urges Myanmar Rohingya 'citizenship' to end exodus
  5. UN: 300-400 new cholera cases per day among Burundians in Tanzania
  6. Iraq's Sunni tribes feel deserted after Ramadi fall
  7. London cabbie bombmaker 'murdered US soldier in Iraq'
  8. US blacklists Iraqi firm helping Iran buy Airbus planes
  9. Raids hit Yemen rebels, allies ahead of new talks bid
  10. Polls open for Irish referendum on gay marriage
  11. Official: Myanmar navy carries out first rescue of migrant boat
  12. UK PM predicts 'ups and downs' in EU renegotiation bid
  13. UK's Cameron to visit Paris, Berlin for talks next week
  14. Iraqi PM in Russia urges cooperation on fighting IS
  15. Qatar hits back at Amnesty labor claims
  16. Libya says 11 killed in fresh Benghazi clashes
  17. AFP: Burundi protesters battle police in Bujumbura center
  18. Syria's Palmyra in peril as IS seizes ancient city
  19. Bahrain verdict in opposition chief trial next month
  20. Bridge opens to let displaced Iraqis flee Anbar

Khader Adnan recounts 66-day hunger strike

May 5, 2012 9:30 P.M. (Updated: May 6, 2012 8:12 P.M.)
BETHLEHEM (Ma'an) -- Hunger strike is the last tool Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails turn to in order to secure their basic needs while in custody, according to detainees.

Khader Adhan, the ex-prisoner who held the longest known Palestinian hunger strike, says refusing to take food is a dangerous step as it eventually jeopardizes prisoners' lives.

Adnan spoke to Ma’an on Friday about his experience.

“During the first days, I lost appetite and suffered headaches for several hours, especially after the fifth day. The sense of smell became very strong and I could smell food from a long distance,” he said.

Adnan says that from day five to 38 he was stable, but from day 38 to 57 he suffered severe vomiting and yellow secretions from the stomach and liver. On day 58, says Adnan, he vomited seven times and suffered from severe pain in the lower abdomen.

However, from day 58 to the last day, 66, when he ended the strike, Adnan says that he was healthier than the days before.

“During the first seven days, I had basic checkups such as blood pressure, diabetes, temperature, and weight, but after the seventh day I refused to take any checkups until day 43 in an attempt to escalate the situation.”

On day 43, Adnan says he agreed to go to a civilian hospital outside, where doctors discovered the potassium rate in his blood was too low and that could negatively affect the electrical conduction system of the heart, which could eventually result in blood clot.

“I was taken to several hospitals, and on day 54 blood tests revealed that my sugar rates were very low, and they gave me glucose," he explained.

"They offered to give me artery feeding, but I refused despite that the Red Cross, the Palestinian minister of health and the Palestinian leadership confirmed it would not mean an end to the hunger strike.”

Adnan highlighted that he did not refuse to take water except for a few hours on one day as a sort of escalation to put more pressure on the Israelis. He said refusing water was a mistake.

Six days after he ended the hunger strike, Adnan says he began to experience troubles in the small intestine and underwent a surgical operation, but now he is healthy.

Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015