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Britain bans radical Israeli rabbi

Aug. 11, 2011 11:29 A.M. (Updated: Aug. 12, 2011 10:45 A.M.)
TEL AVIV, Israel (Ma'an) -- The British border agency has informed a fundamentalist Rabbi that he will not be allowed to enter the country for the next three years, Israeli daily Haaretz reported Thursday.

Rabbi Yosef Elitzur received a letter from the British authorities, signed by the home secretary, informing him of their decision.

Elitzur is co-author of the hard-line book "The King's Torah" and was briefly arrested in Israel last August on suspicion of incitement to violence.

Riots took place in Israel in July 2011 after police arrested a Rabbi who had endorsed the controversial book.

Over 1,000 supporters of Yaakov Yosef, son of one of Israel's top religious leaders, took to streets after reports of his arrest.

The book, which has been banned from sale in Israel, reportedly says babies and children of Israel's enemies may be killed in certain circumstances since "it is clear that they will grow to harm us."

It also says non-Jews are "uncompassionate by nature" and that attacks on them "curb their evil inclination."

"Anywhere where the influence of gentiles constitutes a threat to the life of Israel, it is permissible to kill them," the authors wrote.

AFP contributed to this report
Ma'an News Agency
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