Thursday, July 30
Latest News
  1. In Iraq bastions, PKK braces for new war with Turkey
  2. Five dead in attacks as Turkey battles PKK
  3. Pakistan says second round of Afghan-Taliban talks postponed
  4. Humanitarian chief: Yemen blockade 'killing' civilians
  5. OPEC chief says oil cartel 'not ready' to cut production
  6. Syrian Kurds refine oil for themselves for first time
  7. Deadly car bomb hits Yemen capital as fighting rages in south
  8. Army: Nigeria appoints new head of multinational force on Boko Haram
  9. Analysts: Allies tolerate Turkey's double game to boost IS fight
  10. Afghan Taliban unaware of peace talks, no comment on Mullah Omar
  11. At least 12 dead as truck hits pilgrims in Mexico
  12. White House: Report of Mullah Omar death 'credible'
  13. Federal Reserve holds key rate unchanged
  14. Kuwait's Zain telecom Q2 profit dives over Arab unrest
  15. IS car bomb kills 4 near mosque in Yemen capital
  16. Pentagon assures it will check Iran's 'malign' influence
  17. Afghan intelligence: Taliban leader Mullah Omar is dead
  18. Legal source: Egyptian electrocuted trying to sneak onto Eurostar:
  19. Yemen to merge 'resistance' fighters with army
  20. UN envoy invites Syrians to parallel, thematic talks

Shepherd held for hours over grazing lands

June 8, 2011 7:26 P.M. (Updated: June 9, 2011 8:48 P.M.)
HEBRON (Ma’an) -- Israeli police detained a Hebron shepherd for hours on Tuesday, saying he had allowed his heard of sheep and goats to illegally enter a "closed military zone."

Bilal Hathaleen, 25 from the village of Um Al-Kheir in the south Hebron hills was grazing his flock not far from home when he was apprehended by police and told that he was in a zone too close to the nearby Karmel settlement.

After his release, the shepherd told Ma'an he had been detained for four hours, and had not been aware that the area was a closed zone.

"Already we have limited access to grazing lands," he said, lamenting prospects for adequately feeding his flock.

"Herders are regularly denied access to lands near Israeli settlements," Human rights activist Hisham Sharabati told Ma'an, saying he had received reports of settler violence and harassment from Karmel residents over the previous two days, that kept locals away from the area.

He said the issue was getting acute, since water wells for animals to drink from are located in the region south of the settlement.

Another Umm Al-Kheir resident, 40-year-old shepherd Yasser Hathaleen, told Ma'an that the day earlier, an Israeli soldier had kicked a she-goat, killing it.

Settlers throw stones repeatedly, he said, trying to usher shepherds out of their pasture land. "We make our living this way," he added, fearing "they want us to go so they can expand the settlement."
Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015