Monday, Aug. 03
Latest News
  1. Teen stabbed at Gay Pride march dies as pressure mounts on Israel
  2. Kerry pledges support for Egypt in Cairo talks
  3. UAE to try 41 on charges of seeking 'caliphate'
  4. Two Turkish troops killed in 'PKK suicide attack'
  5. Iraqis protest over poor services, salty tap water
  6. Exiled Yemen PM makes symbolic Aden visit to lead restoration
  7. New Taliban leader calls for unity in ranks in first audio message
  8. Iraqi Kurdistan leadership says PKK should leave
  9. Kerry lands in Egypt on first leg of Mideast tour
  10. Iraqis protest over poor services, salty tap water
  11. Dozens dead as Syria army 'pushes back rebels near regime heartland'
  12. Yemen PM returns to Aden from Saudi exile
  13. Airport source: Yemen PM returns to Aden from Saudi exile
  14. New Taliban leader calls for unity in ranks in first audio message
  15. Iraqis vent rage at power shortages, 'corrupt' leaders
  16. Report: Some 260 PKK members killed in Turkey air strikes
  17. Iraqi Kurdistan urges Turkey to halt PKK bombardment
  18. Bin Laden relatives killed in UK plane crash
  19. Five Libyan troops killed, 18 missing after 'IS attack'
  20. 'Qaeda' suicide bombing kills 9 in Yemen

Abu Libdeh: Rawabi can absorb settlement workers

Oct. 23, 2010 10:24 P.M. (Updated: Oct. 30, 2010 1:16 P.M.)
RAMALLAH (Ma'an) -- PA National Economy Minister Hassan Abu Libdeh said Saturday that the first planned Palestinian city in Ramallah could be "a real opportunity to absorb Palestinian workers employed in settlements," a statement read.

The Rawabi City project, he said, could provide between 8,000 to 10,000 jobs during the construction period and up to 3,000 jobs in the city itself once complete.

"This will contribute to the flourishing of the Palestinian economy, creating alternatives for Palestinian workers in Israeli settlements, especially as the city is established on supporting national industry," the minister added.

The PA announced a boycott of settlement goods at the beginning of 2010, later saying it would criminalize working in settlements. Officials said they hoped to find alternative jobs for settlement workers by the end 2011, but have been criticized for the short time-frame and lack of alternative work opportunities for those affected.

In October, Israel's environment minister said he would attempt to block Rawabi's construction over concerns for the environment. Abu Libdeh denounced the comments, and said Israel was "trying, through weak excuses, to weaken our national economy.

"Any obstruction to such a project is an obstruction to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state," he added.

He described the project as "very important," providing housing for thousands of Palestinians and said it was carefully planned out with international partners "in contradiction to the illegal and random settlements that do not take into consideration the simplest environmental concerns, when the harmed ones are the Palestinian villages they surround."

Powered By: HTD Technologies
Ma'an News Agency
All rights reserved © 2005-2015